Review of blogs 2017

BILAN DES BLOGS 2017

 The articles that you could read on this blog, opened since April 2008, are published on over-blog, then on wordpress in English since April 12, 2017 with the help of Google, on the blog hosted by Mediapart, since December 2014 and on Agoravox since 2011.

BILAN DES BLOGS 2017

Over-blog since its creation, 06/04/08.

Table 1: Number of unique visitors, seen pages, articles by year

Year

Visitors

Seen Pages

Articles (Press Revue)

Visitors/Article

2008

318

953

12 (0)

27

2009

751

1 406

40 (0)

19

2010

2 702

5 237

56 (12)

49

2011

5 019

10 762

92 (35)

55

2012

8 308

16 330

137 (46)

61

2013

6 126

10 699

75 (32)

82

2014

5 212

8 715

81 (29)

64

2015

6 690

9 311

79 (13)

85

2016

8 011

10 150

49 (0)

163

2017

4 608

6 295

53 (0)

87

Total

47 745

79 858

491 (167)

72

– Number of subscribers to the blog: 14.

– About 5,000 unique visitors and 8,000 seen pages per year. All without net progression over time: 2016 most favorable year, 2017 lowest since 2010.

– Each person saw, on average, 1.67 pages since the beginning: 2.9 in 2008, then, the visitors look at fewer and fewer pages to arrive at 1.27 in 2016 and 1.37 in 2017.

– Each article has been viewed from the beginning, on average, by 72 visitors. This number increased sharply in 2016 with 163 visitors per article. But returned to 87 in 2017.

– It is not possible to know the most read articles since the beginning of the blog, only the 10 most read articles each month.
By taking these 10 articles, each month, Table 2 allows to obtain the 5 most consulted in 2016: they are old, concern immigration and bio-ethics. The same calculation for 2017 shows a similar result for the first 5 titles but with a significantly lower number of readers.
Next come articles devoted to Camus. News articles are less watched, by nature more « perishable ».

 

Table 2: Most read articles

Title of the article

In 2016

In 2017

Publication date

Nationalité, citoyenneté, droit de vote des résidents (2art.)

1687

555

29/10/09

Peut-on parler de races humaines

1045

778

16/10/10

Droit du sol/Droit du sang en Italie

561

300

13/02/12

Pourquoi n’avons-nous pas pu obtenir le droit de vote

564

66

14/12/09

Procréation médicalement assistée

405

146

19/04/15

Premier homme

93

99

23/01/14

BILAN DES BLOGS 2017

WordPress

On wordpress, it is possible to know the geographical origin of the visitors every month for the first 10 countries. The most numerous visitors from 2012 to 2016 come from France 1433 on 1867, they decrease each year. Next come the United States with 194 visitors, including 86 in 2017 alone. Effect, perhaps, of the presentation in English of the texts, since 23 visits came from the United States between April and December 2016 against 72 during the same period 2017. This does not seem to play for other geographical origins.

Table 3: Number of visits, visitors, published articles.

Yearf

Visits

Visitors

Published articles.

Visits/article

2012

344

28

28

12,3

2013

550

257

70

7,8

2014

431

300

80

5,4

2015

279

212

71

3,9

2016

128

88

46

2,8

2017

194

162

46

4,2

Total

1926

885

295

6,5

– 7 subscribers, apparently Francophones

 Table 4: National Origin of Readers

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Total

France

322

452

308

187

83

81

1433

États-Unis

7

10

24

43

24

86

194

Brésil

4

0

7

12

12

7

42

R-U

1

4

16

11

0

3

35

Autres

9

65

54

16

9

10

163

Total

343

531

409

269

128

187

1867

BILAN DES BLOGS 2017

Mediapart

The articles are also published on the personal blog of Mediapart, (12 subscribers, 16 contacts). Since its creation on December 22, 2014, 118 articles have been published. The number of readers is not known. For each article, the reader can leave a « comment » or « recommend » it.

Table 5: Number of published articles , « comments », « recommend ».

Year

Published articles

Comments

Recommend

2014

2

2

4

2015

30

52

57

2016

40

16

41

2017

46

19

43

Total

118

89

145

BILAN DES BLOGS 2017

Agoravox

On Agoravox, the number of people who consult the articles can be known.

From 2/06/11 to 29/12/17, 229 articles were published and 379,822 visitors left 2,706 comments. On average, each article was viewed 1,696 times (and commented 12 times) ranging from 1,170 visitors in 2012 to 2,026 times in 2017. But this number varies greatly depending on the articles: 381 for Pas de vie sans frontière (10 / 01/12), 12,780 for A propos de l’Étranger d’Albert Camus (03/12/13).

Table 6 shows articles that had more than 3,000 readers, 4 relate to the EU, 3 to books by Albert Camus.

Posting in Agoravox has several interests: an incomparably larger, more diverse and more politicized audience than personal blogs. This is seen through reactions that are more numerous and sometimes lively. And can go beyond the subject of the article

Articles on Camus are at the forefront but also news articles.

 Table 6 – Articles with more than 3,000 visitors on Agoravox

Title

Date

Number of readers

A propos de LÉtranger d’Albert Camus

03/12/13

12 780

A propos de La Mort heureuse d’Albert Camus

12/11/13

8 329

Immigration et Union Européenne : La crise migratoire

22/10/15

8 170

Comparaison de journaux français/étrangers du 25/09/14

04/11/14

7 452

Immigration et UE : La crise migratoire

22/10/15

6 183

Démocratie directe, Démocratie indirecte, Démocratie !

21/02/14

5 620

A propos de Lettres à un ami allemand d’Albert Camus

17/10/13

4 733

Les étrangers dans l’UE

26/07/11

4 996

L’Union européenne ébranlée

17/07/11

4 654

Touchée ! Coulée ? L’UE et les réfugiés

17/03/16

4 581

Démocratie directe. Démocratie indirecte. Démocratie !

21/02/14

4 505

Ségolène Royal : parachutage ou chute aidée ?

18/06/12

3 773

Après les attentats

22/11/15

3 692

La pierre qui pousse d’Albert Camus : note critique

28/02/14

3 401

Gouverner, c’est choisir

30/07/16

3 147

Boulevard Marine Le Pen

09/07/11

3 100

Mélenchon part en campagne

12/06/16

3 072

L’Union européenne affolée !

27/06/16

3 066

Le Joly pavé du 14 juillet

18/07/11

3 010

BILAN DES BLOGS 2017

Twitter, Facebook, Linkeln

When they are published, all articles are announced on Twitter (43 subscribers), Facebook (193 friends) and Linkedln (51 contacts) to inform them of their publication.

On Twitter are also published, from day to day, mood tones tweets (bad), 1,138 from the beginning, which are then grouped in the blog (over-blog) under the headings 1, 2, 3 updated regularly.

BILAN DES BLOGS 2017

Conclusion

For 10 years, I tried to publish regularly articles on over-blog and a press review on political news.
After a while, I gave up the press review, which was hardly read.

I tried to vary the articles, with photos taken during events, articles on the cinema, following the Pesaro, Cannes, Venice festivals, reading notes resulting from the discussions within the framework of the Cercle des Chamailleurs or anecdotal relationships, holidays or everyday life.

At the beginning of this year, during the annual review, I decided to stop writing articles regularly. Maybe on occasion, if I feel the need … an article or some pictures.


With my best of peace and health … and some pictures for the valiant ones who will have arrived there …
BILAN DES BLOGS 2017
BILAN DES BLOGS 2017
BILAN DES BLOGS 2017
BILAN DES BLOGS 2017
BILAN DES BLOGS 2017
BILAN DES BLOGS 2017
BILAN DES BLOGS 2017
Publicités

Brief stay in Naples and surroundings …

Bref séjour à Naples et environs...

Français

Christmas is probably not the best time to visit Naples and its surroundings. However, we can bring some images to share …

Beyond the usual misadventures of which one is warned but … (this time, a handbag taken while he was in a backpack).

On the evening of December 24 and 25, most restaurants are closed. We ate the evening of the 24th in an Indian restaurant and the 25th in a Chinese restaurant.

By decision of the municipality, line 1 of the metro did not work the afternoon of the 25th. We left on the 26th which is also a public holiday …

Here are some pictures taken at random walks, starting with the DUOMO

Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...

Some views of the city …

Bref séjour à Naples et environs...Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
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and emblematic places …

Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
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Bref séjour à Naples et environs...

A quick visit to the rich museums of Naples

Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...

and asample of secret cabinet pieces…

Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...

Streets of the historic center

Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
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… which are also a form of museum, by the street paintings

Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
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Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...

the storefronts …

Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...

subway …

Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...

and animation: commedia del’arte, Christmas cribs, new figurines

Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...
Bref séjour à Naples et environs...

and not far away, Vesuvius …

Bref séjour à Naples et environs...

To be continued … for the surroundings … Pompei, Sorrento, Amalfi.

… around Naples …

... les environs de Naples...

Français

What to fear here is not the dog but Vesuvius. Always asleep but never off.

The environs of Naples are the Roman remains that recall his mood swings and the Amalfi Coast.

From Naples, with the train, one can easily go to Herculaneum or Pompeii, to the Roman remains and to Sorrento. From Sorrento, the bus can reach Amalfi by the coast and Capri by boat …

The most famous remains are those of Pompeii. Many essential pieces are in museums. It remains the site …

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The « surroundings » of Naples, it is also the Amalfi Coast But no more than Rome, all this can « be done » in a single day, with the bus.

Some images of Sorrento … from the coast of Sorrento to Amalfi …

  Sorrento

... les environs de Naples...
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… from Sorrento to Amalfi by bus … by the coast

 

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… and, finally, Amalfi.

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 But here, as everywhere, CAVE CANEM

... les environs de Naples...

Women’s long struggle for equality (2)

La longue lutte des Femmes pour l’égalité (2)

Taking the opposite view of Albert Einstein, some people, in favor of authorizing ethnic statistics, say that which is not cunted does not count (1). Statistics, beyond the equality proclaimed, make it possible to show the gender inequalities in the facts and the slow progress towards equality in different domains.

Politically. The proportion of women in the European Parliament is gradually increasing from 16.6% in 1979-84 to 36.6% in 2014-19. This proportion varies from one country to another, at the lowest, in Poland, Hungary, Slovakia and Bulgaria (respectively 17.7%, 19.1%, 23.1% and 23.5% of European women deputies). ), Sweden and Finland (55% and 53.9%). France is with 43.2% is in fifth place (2).

« Toute l’Europe » published, in September 2017, information on the proportion of women in national parliaments, the lower house only (in France, Assemblée nationale). Again, Sweden and Finland top the table with respectively 43.6% and 42% women Members of Parliament, Spain comes in third (39.1%). But these countries are only, respectively, 6th, 9th and 14th in the world ranking. At the bottom of the table are Latvia (16%), Malta (11.9%) and Hungary (10.1%). With 38.8% of women deputies, France comes fourth (3).

In France, the proportion of women in the Senate is lower than in the Assemblée nationale: 31.8%. However, it has been steadily increasing since 2001 (Table 1)

Table 1: Number and Percentage of Women in the Senate (4)

Election

Number

Percentage

2001

35

10,9 %

2004

60

18,1 %

2008

75

21,9 %

2011

77

22,10%

2014

87

25,0 %

2017

110

31,80%

Regarding the ministerial posts, for the 28 States of the Union, the proportion of women is only 25%. On the first of July 2017, two countries have more female ministers than male ministers: France (58%, excluding secretaries of state) and Sweden (52%), followed by Slovenia (44%). At the bottom of the table, Malta and Slovakia (14%) and Cyprus and Hungary who have no women at the head of a ministry (5).

After the last cabinet reshuffle, the French government, consisting of the Prime Minister, is made up of 20 ministers, 11 women and 9 men, and 12 secretaries of state, 7 men and 5 women, ie 32 posts equally distributed.

If inequalities slowly fade at the level of deputies and ministers, we are still far from the mark in certain functions. Despite the parity law of June 2000, 83% of outgoing mayors in 2014 were men (6) and 87% of the top of the 2014 municipal elections (7).

La longue lutte des Femmes pour l’égalité (2)

he situation is evolving even more slowly at the social and economic level.

In the European Union, the average wage gap between men and women, which was 17% in 2012, increased to 16.7 in 2014 and 16.3 in 2015. However, depending on the country, this difference varies from 5.5 to 26.9%. In Italy and Luxembourg (5.5%), Romania (5.8%), Poland (7.7%) and Slovenia (8.1%) the gaps are the lowest, the largest are Estonia (26.9%), the Czech Republic (22.5%), Germany (22%), Austria (21.7%) and the United Kingdom (20.8%).
France is in the middle of the table with 15.8% (8).

In France, entrepreneurs are mostly men: 60% of autoentrepreneurs, 75% of managers of limited liability companies and 83% of salaried managers of other companies, according to INSEE (9). The proportion of women decreases as the size of the enterprise increases: 37% of people working alone in their company, 28% in companies with 2 to 4 people, 16% in companies with 20 to 49 people and 14% in companies with businesses with 50 or more people. They are fewer in these positions and earn less: 31% less than men. What INSEE explains by fewer hours worked over the year (10)

Alternatives économiques examines the proportion of women and men who have a managerial position based on their academic background (Table 2).

Table 2: Percentage of women and men framework according to the diplomas

Niveau

% women managerial staff

% men managerial staff

Bac+2

8,6

23,4

Bac+3 ou plus

35,9

62,2

At the equivalent level, the employment rate of women is lower than that of men and women are less often managers than men. In total, men’s incomes are more than 30% higher than those of women at all levels of education and even reach 46% for holders of Bac + 3 and above. These inequalities appear from the beginning of the professional activities and increase thereafter: which means lower income for women by 25% compared to men at 25 and 64% at 65 (11)! For the positions of CEO, if we believe LeFigaro, things do not seem to improve. In 2015, just under one in five companies changed CEOs globally, the highest rate in 16 years. On this occasion, of the 359 new appointments, 10 were women, or 3% (12).

In terms of wages and employment, the road to gender equality will be long.

La longue lutte des Femmes pour l’égalité (2)

Women’s long struggle for equality (1)

La longue lutte des Femmes pour l’égalité (1)

The day of November 25 is dedicated by the UN to violence against women. This year, it has had a significant impact. Probably because it was coming after the Harvey Weinstein affair. It is to be hoped that, one event chasing the other, the question will not be forgotten until next year.

In 1993, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women, and in 1999, on 25 November, was proclaimed International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, in remembrance of the assassination, sponsored by the dictator Rafael Trujillo, of the three Mirabal sisters, Dominican political activists, on November 25, 1960.

 Some figures, published on the occasion of this day, give an idea of the extent of the problem.
According to the United Nations, data from 87 countries from 2005 to 2016, 19% of women aged 15 to 49 report having experienced physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner in the 12 months preceding the survey (1).

In the European Union, in 2015, 215,000 sexual crimes were reported to the police, one-third of them rapes. The victims are women in 90% of the cases and 99% of those imprisoned for these crimes are men.

In France, the police registered 16,741 complaints, nearly 50 sexual assault reports and 31 rape complaints per 100,000 inhabitants (10,729 complaints in total).
All these figures probably underestimate the importance of the phenomenon because they only count the cases reported to the police (2).

Beyond the case, we must not forget a permanent and universal phenomenon. In the UN survey, cited above, in 2012, nearly half of the world’s female homicide victims were killed by an intimate partner or family member, compared with 6% of men.
In France, two women die every week and one man every two weeks because of violence in the couple.

The main cause, for homicide men, is the refusal of a separation in progress or that has already taken place. For women, often victims of previous violence, it is the occasion of yet another dispute (3).

In 2014, La Croix reported a survey of the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights on 42,000 Europeans: one in five women reported being victims of physical and / or sexual violence. For France, one in four women. And three out of four French women have been harassed against one in two in Europe. Nearly one out of two had to deal with physical, sexual or psychological violence in childhood against a third of Europeans.
Surprisingly enough in this study, the Scandinavian countries, Finland, Sweden, are rather misclassified. More than the importance of violence, this would translate into a more free speech of women, more aware (4).

Whatever the studies, the results do not make it possible to establish a track record between the countries because the figures collected depend enormously on the conditions of collection of information, sensitization and general attitudes towards sexual violence. They only allow to highlight and the ubiquity and the importance of the problem.

Sexual harassment, rape are widespread in time, they do not date from yesterday, and in space, social classes, countries, continents.

La longue lutte des Femmes pour l’égalité (1)

The Harvey Weinstein affair played a special role this year, because Hollywood’s most powerful film producer thought himself untouchable and had a behavior that everyone knew was particularly hateful.
For this behavior to be denounced in the press, it took women who have a certain social surface to publicly assume their accusation.

Two well-known women journalists: Megan Twohey, who helped uncover, among other things, the behavior of Donald J. Trump towards women and Jodi Kantor, a specialist in gender and labor issues that followed the US presidential campaign of 2008 , who challenged Harvey Weinstein, in the New York Times on October 5, 2017. They were relayed on October 10 by an article by New Yorker Ronan Farrow.

In total, Harvey Weinstein has been publicly charged with sexual harassment, offering to promote their career for sexual favors, wanting to buy the silence of some of his victims for large sums and rapes, which many people knew, by more than 70 women, mostly actresses but also employees, journalists, producers, models who felt strong enough for that.

These behaviors are more prevalent among women in situations of weakness for whom it is difficult to protest. Sometimes, it is the victims who are condemned! In 2007, a MeToo campaign was launched to denounce sexual violence, particularly against visible minorities. Without much success (5).
This year, following articles in the two prestigious newspapers, an American actress is proposing to resume the #metoo campaign to share stories of sexual and gender-based violence in different media. Other personalities are implicated. From there, other women rose, all over the world ..

This campaign is taken over in France in the form #BalanceTonPorc so that fear changes camp. It’s a quick success. And #MeToo and also taken in 85 countries including, after the United States, the UK, India, Pakistan, Japan … But still in other languages and countries: in French in Canada, in Arabic, Tunisia, Egypt, Dubai: أنا_كمان, China: # 我 也是, Spain: # YoTambién, South Korea: # 나도, Vietnam: # TôiCũngVậy, Israel: גםאנחנו # (UsAussi), Italy: #QuellaVoltaChe (TheTimewhen)

The messages broadcast report facts from words to rape through harassment, aggression … in different professional circles (entertainment world, politics, finance, sport …), school, family, sometimes by designating known personalities. Some of whom resign from their job …

La longue lutte des Femmes pour l’égalité (1)

In this story, the insightful philosopher Alain Finkielkraut immediately sees the profound meaning of the operation one of the objectives of the campaign #balancetonporc was to play the fish of Islam.
Certainly, it is conceivable that the denunciation of people and the elegant form of the French #BalanceTonPorc shock him. It is much less acceptable that he underestimates the seriousness of the facts, the hierarchical blackmail, the rape, the murdered women …, that it minimizes the courage of these women who expose themselves.
He could have recognized, for once, the benefits of the opening of studies, here and elsewhere, to thousands of girls who, little by little, have acquired the cultural, professional, economic means of their independence.

In 1965, I was very surprised to find in an amphitheater of the faculty of letters in Toulouse that the vast majority of the audience was female! I came to the conclusion that it had to be translated, one day or another, at the level of society. I did not know how

Quite simply, for fifty years, women have taken charge of struggles for their liberation, their autonomy and equal rights. That this poses problems for some people, for society … it is obvious, but liberation poses always problems. A new balance is to be found.

Now, we must hope that this event does not fall into oblivion until the next case. That it will favor, at least in certain societies, the evolution of mentalities not towards a war of the sexes but towards the invention of a new living together, more balanced.

La longue lutte des Femmes pour l’égalité (1)

ATTAC and Climate

français

Some pictures of the Attac event at the One Planet Summit on the Place du Pantheon in Paris, against investments and subsidies for the energies of the past. Which lead humanity to its loss.

 

ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
Les peuples submergés par les pussances économiques et financières....
Les peuples submergés par les pussances économiques et financières....
Les peuples submergés par les pussances économiques et financières....
Les peuples submergés par les pussances économiques et financières....
Les peuples submergés par les pussances économiques et financières....
Les peuples submergés par les pussances économiques et financières....
Les peuples submergés par les pussances économiques et financières....
Les peuples submergés par les pussances économiques et financières....
Les peuples submergés par les pussances économiques et financières....

People submerged by the economic and financial powers ….

se soulèvent et montrent qu'une autre politique est possible...
se soulèvent et montrent qu'une autre politique est possible...
se soulèvent et montrent qu'une autre politique est possible...

stand up and show that another policy is possible …

ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT
ATTAC et LE CLIMAT

After us the deluge ?

Après nous, le déluge ?

History is made up of struggles, peaceful or otherwise, between social groups. These struggles result in a more or less stable balance, by the victory of one group over the other or by a compromise. Waiting for new conflicts or the rebirth of old conflicts.

At the international level, with nuclear energy, over-armament and the system of blocs and alliances, the risk has appeared of a global conflagration with the possible disappearance of all humanity, belligerents and non-belligerents alike. The awarness of this risk, where everyone would be defeated, led to the Cold War, the balance of terror, the lack of direct confrontation between the two world superpowers, the persistent military confrontation across wars by local belligerents interposed …

The disappearance of the USSR has diminished, without making it unthinkable, the risk of widespread nuclear conflict. Because states in latent conflict have nuclear weapons and remain a danger for humanity … Hence the interest of a treaty of generalized nuclear disarmament.

Today, there is a new risk for humanity and many life forms on the planet: the competition of all against all, individuals or groups, with the development of technical and scientific possibilities in the search for ever more, more, more accumulation and grabbing of material goods, …
Come what may.

This infinite course does not evolve as it was announced towards the exhaustion of the resources, more or less repulsed by the discovery of new deposits or means of exploitation.But the release into the earth, into the water, into the air of products make them dangerous, unfit for consumption and a factor of climatic disturbance with catastrophic consequences .

Après nous, le déluge ?

Climate-skeptics are increasingly rare even though the weight of Donald Trump is not negligible. If they think that global warming is not exclusively due to human activity, they should admit that it is not useful for it to contribute to it …

At the international level, the important influence of human activities on the future of the planet has been recognized for many years now. At the request of the G7, under the pressure of Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was created in 1988 to counter a UN agency that was too supportive of climate change.

Since then, the Giec keeps issuing warnings. The first report (1990) reported that since 1900 the temperature had increased by about 0.5 ° C. In the third (2001), he predicted a temperature increase between 1.4 ° C and 5.8 ° C between 1990 and 2100 and reported that the rate of warming was unprecedented for the last ten millennia. The fifth (2014) stated that it was possible to limit the rise in temperature to 2 ° C more than before the industrial revolution if greenhouse gas emissions were reduced by 40 to 70% between 2010 and 2050 And also that the only use of available fossil fuel reserves would lead to a warming of 4 to 5 ° C in 2100 …

The most dangerous does not appear the depletion of reserves but the discovery of news that could lead to their exploitation and global warming … of 7 or 8 ° C in the following century (1)

These reports served as a basis for international meetings where resolutions are adopted by more and more States. But without major practical consequences for the moment.

Après nous, le déluge ?

It is not possible, however, to say that nothing has changed. The question, with the help of large ecological organizations, more than ecological parties that have not even been able to take advantage of the wave, has entered the public debate.

The Paris Conference, despite its shortcomings, is a major event: for the first time, all states on the planet agree on the diagnosis. The signed text sets a goal quantified, even if it is insufficient and especially insufficiently funded, even if, 2 years later, the commitments of the signatories are not up to the situation.
Even though COP23 took place in the absence of one of the most polluting states on the planet at the moment when 15,364 scientists from 184 countries, biologists, physicists, astronomers, chemists, agronomists … launched a cry of alarm … on the state of the planet, a warning to humanity (2).

From now on, scientists know and let know what they know, in particular the risks of turning to the irreversible. Governments know. Politicians know. The people know. Everyone knows.

We all know. We continue to behave as if we do not believe in what we know. Sometimes, what we say! Powers act more in terms of their short-term interest than in the maintenance of life, of humanity in the time ahead.

However, a part of the population is already suffering the consequences of climate change: natural disasters, but data from the UN Office for Risk Reduction show that in 2014, 87% were linked to global warming of the planet (3).

Après nous, le déluge ?
More and more displaced people are forced to flee their land due to the intensity of extreme natural disasters (4). In its first report on the uprooted by climate change, Oxfam estimates them at 23.5 million in 2016: total not taking into account the slow and not spectacular catastrophes, droughts or rise of the level of the sea. (5). In 2014, 87% of climate refugees were Asian.
Pollution is responsible for 5.5 million premature deaths worldwide each year, half in China and India (6).

COP23 was chaired by the Republic of Fiji, reflecting the concern of many Pacific islands threatened with extinction by the rising waters: 9.2 million people in 22 island states. Some may disappear in the next thirty years.
Lawyers take the issue seriously. They are wondering what will become of the island states that are going to be submerged when, according to international law, territorial sovereignty and the benefits derived from it presuppose a natural expanse of land surrounded by water that remains uncovered at high tide. (7).
Populations have already started to emigrate (57% of Samoans and 46% of Tongans live abroad).
To prevent or reduce the severity of future disasters, COP21 agreed to limit global warming to no more than 2 degrees and, if possible, to 1.5 by 2100. COP23 acknowledged that current state commitments and that warming is more likely to be 3 degrees or more (8).

In France, according to a report by ADEME, it is possible to produce 100% of electricity with renewable energies in 2050: 63% wind, 17% solar, 13% hydro, 7% thermal. Which would not cost more than keeping 50% of nuclear as planned.
But this report has disappeared (9). And for the moment, France is falling behind on its commitments.

Given the weakness of policies, the immediate interests of financiers, an international popular mobilization is necessary to push for effective decision-making.

Beyond the country, French banks play a big role in financial investments in very important mining projects. While developing a rhetoric against climate change, French banks increased by 218% their financing in the coal sector between 2005 and 2013. Over this period, France is the fourth country that has financed the most. sector, behind China, the United States and the United Kingdom.
But it is possible to put pressure on these banks that are sensitive to their image: BNP Paribas, Crédit Agricole and Societe Generale have pledged to stop funding Pharaonic mining projects in the Galilee basin, near the eastern coast of the Australia where stands the Great Barrier Reef. (10).

Après nous, le déluge ?
At the initiative of Emmanuel Macron, after the withdrawal of the United States from the Paris agreement, the One Planet Summit will be held at the Seine Musical in December. It will welcome 2000 people including a hundred heads of state or government. This summit is organized with the UN, the OECD, the European Union, the World Covenant of Mayors, the C40 cities network, the NGOs of the Climate Action Network, companies, on the search for funding to accelerate the fight against global warming (11).
Will one month after COP23 be more effective than this one?

In the meantime, carbon dioxide emissions will increase by 2% in 2017, while they have been stable since 2014, according to a study by the international consortium of scientists, the Global Carbon Project. Staying below 2 ° C warming by 2100 seems unreachable. Without a very rapid decline in carbon emissions, warming of 1.5 ° C will be achieved in ten years, 2 ° C in a few decades and 3 or 4 ° C by the end of the century (12).

Some 20 countries, at the initiative of Canada and the United Kingdom, including France, Costa Rica, Fiji, Denmark, the Netherlands, Finland, Italy and New Zealand, announced , at COP23, their desire to close the coal plants by 2030 at the latest.
The notion of growth is, more and more, to question. But the United States since 2005 has reduced carbon dioxide emissions by 11.5 percent by increasing national wealth by 15 percent, according to the US representative at COP23. In 2017, after five years of decline, carbon dioxide emissions from coal are expected to increase slightly as a result of price developments and Donald Trump’s willingness to revive this energy (13).

Climate events are all the more catastrophic as they cause material and human damage. These disasters mainly affect the weakest populations: the poorest countries, the least well-equipped or organized and, in rich countries, the poorest populations.

At the global level, the richest 10% are the source of 50% of greenhouse gas emissions, while the poorest 50% contribute 10%. At the scale of a country like India, half of the emissions related to the electric production is the fact of less than 15% of the population, whereas nearly a third of the Indians is deprived of access to the network (14).

Finally, rich countries pollute more per capita than poor countries. In rich countries and poor countries, rich people pollute more than poor people. And it is these people who hold the power of decision. While before reaching everyone, climate disasters primarily affect poor and poor countries.

Those who hold the powers are the most dangerous for the future. This is to say the difficulty of making decisions that call into question the financial, economic, social and political organization. And even more to apply them.

Everyone knows.

The year 2016 was the hottest since the first recordings at the end of the 19th century. The displaced are millions.
If a change of course is not taken quickly, after us the deluge may not be a metaphor! 

Après nous, le déluge ?

1 – https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groupe_d%27experts_intergouvernemental_sur_l%27%C3%A9volution_du_climat)

2 – Le Monde 13/11/17

3 – Libération 16/03/15

4 – Le Monde 02/11/17

5 – http://www.oxfamfrance.org/rapports/changement-climatique-protection-des-civils-crises-humanitaires/deracines-par-changement

6 – Le Figaro 12/02/16

7 – Foreign affairs 04/09/15, cité par Courrier international 17/12 06/01/16

8 – Le Monde 31/10/17

9 – Mediapart 08/04/15

10 – Le Monde.fr 08/04/15

11 – La Tribune 07/11/17

12 – Mediapart 14/11/17

13 – Le Figaro 16/11/17

14 – Alternatives économiques 16/11/2017

Ardiente Paciencia, Il postino, The Postman

Ardiente Paciencia, Il postino, Le Facteur

Antonio Skármeta wrote Ardiente Paciencia which inspired Michael Radford to realize Il postino (The postman). Book and film tell the story of the friendship between the young man who wants to become a poet to seduce women and his only everyday client, Pablo Neruda. (1). When Mario discovers the beautiful Beatriz, he will make the poet his accomplice at first involuntary then benevolent and effective in his poetic education and conquest …

 This story of love and poetry unfolds in parallel and in harmony with that of Salvador Allende in the conquest and exercise of power and his fall. During this period, Pablo Neruda, very involved in the political events of his country, resides in Black Island, located in Chile in the novel, in Italy in the film. Hence some adaptations at the scenario level.

While the book was written in Spanish and the film was shot in Italian, very often the same text is found in French in the book and in the film. Despite this fidelity to the text, the film and the book have their own identity.

Ardiente Paciencia, Il postino, Le Facteur

In the book, Antonio Skármeta alternates very long sentences with a flood of words, qualifiers that testify to the importance of the phenomenon or feeling described but often with an irony, self-deprecation of the author and a certain truculence. And quick dialogues, sometimes, a popular vocabulary and many traits of spirits that give the reader the smile at times, more or less dramatic for the protagonists.

This aspect is a little erased in the film which insists more on the beauty of the landscapes, the confrontation of the colors: darkness of the post office, pink house of peace and happiness where the postman carries, every day, the mail for Neruda and s opens to poetry and friendship, variations of blue and gray of the sea, calm or agitated, Black Island, volcanic, …

 Paradoxically, where the book gives to see and to hear by the words, the film suggests by the images and the play of the actors, the seductive looks of Maria Grazia Cucinotta (Beatriz), the hands and the very expressive face of Massimo Troisi ( Mario) which contrast with the more restrained game of PN (Philippe Noiret, Pablo Neruda).

 Poetry is often present, as learning, the revelation of metaphor, as a means of seduction for Mario who shamelessly uses the bard’s poems to dominate his shyness and seduce the seductive Beatriz who only asks for this and uses other means; poetry as a transfiguration of reality, sometimes unconscious, Rosa, Beatriz’s mother, reading or hearing the poem Mario gave to her daughter, concludes that he saw Beatriz, naked, because she is just like that (the poem was written for Matilde Neruda’s wife); Mario is seasick listening to a poem recited by Neruda …

 

Ardiente Paciencia, Il postino, Le Facteur
The adaptation of the plot to the Italian situation is at the origin of some welcome scenes: the young Mario is hired because he has a bicycle necessary to carry the mail to Pablo Neruda who lives away from the village and he does not separate from easily, he enters the post office and leaves the cinema with his bicycle (a nod to Vittorio de Sica’s bicycle thief); in Chile, Mario’s hierarchical superior is socialist; in Italy he is a communist; Mario must read one of his poems during a political concentration that ends dramatically, a scene that is perfectly integrated with current images; when Pablo Neruda returns to the village, years later, he enters the cafe, a photo of Beatriz and Mario’s wedding is on the wall, a baby-foot ball bounces on the ground, quickly followed by a boy, Pablito, the son of Mario and Beatriz, reminder of the initial scene of seduction and the first love meeting; last scene, Pablo Neruda on the beach, for the first time, seen from the sea, crushed by the black cliff …

Ardiente Paciencia, Il postino, Le Facteur

The poetic education of the postman by the Nobel laureate Bard is disrupted and eventually interrupted by events happening elsewhere that have serious repercussions on the life of the Black Island. A love story perfectly integrated in History.

 

Ardiente Paciencia, Il postino, Le Facteur

1 – Ardiente Paciencia, book published in Chile in 1985 by Antonio Skármeta, development of the film realized by the author in 1983. This book was translated in French by François Maspéro in 1987. Michael Radford adapted it to the cinema, under the title of Il postino, in 1994 with as main actors Massimo Troisi, Maria Grazia Cucinotta and Philippe Noiret.

1

Do you speak Macron?

Parlez-vous Macron ?

Macron parle riche en plusieurs langues.

During his electoral campaign, Emmanuel Macron goes to Berlin, the custom would like me to speak in French (1) he says: he chooses English to address the French people and Germans who understand, obviously, neither French neither German but, of course, all understand English. It’s normal, it’s modern, there is no French culture, it’s not very Gaullien: other people, other manners. But was he only addressing the French and the Germans? To what French, to what Germans?
Let’s be clear. During his trips to London in preparation for his campaign, he spoke mostly liberal, tinged with a request for financial support.
The place, the subjects, the interlocutors lent themselves well to the use of English.

In many official speeches or interviews, President Macron, whose classmates, among others, do not deny knowledge, wishes to show it. He uses Latin phrases or obsolete words. Listeners or readers consult the dictionary or their newspaper or simply ignore them. But these words join a certain presidential tradition where chien-lit, quarteron, machin or abracadabrantesque and even cabri preceded them. So many winks (2) They affirm the character.

Emmanuel Macron also speaks the language of the private company: already present in the public companies, it makes its entry in the government and in his political organization, stuffed with the Anglicisms of circumstance: benchmark, bottom up, bullish, disrupt, draft, processé ( !), staffer (!), political start-up, start-up nation, top down … Language but also thought and values. Politics is no longer democratic, even in its intentions, the people electing its representatives, but technocratic: the chief chooses experts (3) for his teams, the National Assembly or for his organization and even departmental referents.
Some speak of Jupiter’s presidency, others of president-CEO(,4).

Parlez-vous Macron ?

The language that does not lie, the language of the acts. The first measures make it possible to quickly understand who is the premier de cordée and the  le premier de corvée: adoption by ordinance of the labor laws, removal of the ISF, flat tax of 30% (PFU), removal of personalized assistance to housing (APL), decrease in subsidized jobs, immediate increase in CSG, later compensated.

Interested people fully understand this language.

Parlez-vous Macron ?

At the same time, Emmanuel Macron and his entourage do not hesitate to affirm that the president speaks true (cash in the technico-financial language), speaks people. But some words make cringe, including for the entourage that is then in the explanation of text or context … These words do not constitute gaps, slippages but are aimed at targeted populations: are not there many French people who think that? (5) It does not matter the form. But what he said was heard by the recipients. As in those trials in the United States where a lawyer makes an unacceptable statement, objection your honor, rejected by the judge but the jury members understood the innuendo well.

Parlez-vous Macron ?

So, he can talk cash to some people who, instead of fucking the brothel, would be better off going to look if they can not have jobs there, because there are some who have the qualifications to do it. and it’s not far from home; he claims that he does not want to give in to idlers, cynics and extremes (6), nor to pressure, whatever they may be, especially when they do not have the democratic legitimacy (7), the Medef? trade unions ?

Parlez-vous Macron ?

Emmanuel Macron does not fail to pay homage to the Premier de cordée, to the young, future first of cordée, who désire devenir milliardaire, because the economy of Net is an economy of superstars, (8), to the entrepreneur whose life is often harder than that of an employee. You must never forget it. He can lose everything, and he has fewer guarantees explained the Minister (9).

Now, the president is asking the Guyanese not to confuse him with Santa Claus, he’s already gone for some with the tax cuts! However, he clearly states: I do not like the cynicism, sometimes, of those who succeed, and who fall back into selfishness where the only purpose of life would be to accumulate money. They must also engage in society, creating employment, activity. But the tax cuts are not conditioned by any constraint, no obligation to invest in the real economy. And he does not like the jealousy of saying, those who succeed, we will tax them, massacre them, because we do not like them (10). Emmanuel Macron is generous and protective for minorities!

But whether you like it or not, the words of Emmanuel Macron and his friends ooze scorn.

Here, it is probably the unconscious that speaks: I do not want the least of the French to think that … The least of the French. No, I do not want one Frenchman to think that ... But no. The least of the French. There are French capitals, and lesser French, at the very end of the rope, as Daniel Schneidermann explains (11.

Same bad taste: A station is a place where we meet successful people and people who are nothing (12), not French people who have nothing, who do not have a luxury watch to 50 years old (13), the sans-dent as his predecessor would have said. They have nothing so they are nothing!
Christophe Castaner, spokesman for the government, does not say anything else: I believe that one can be cultivated and speak like the French (14) which they, of course, hav’nt not culture.

It is certain that Emmanuel Macron loves and esteem all of his fellow citizens. Not all the same way. Not some unemployed. We have to make sure that he is looking for, and that he is not a repeat offender. Multi-recidivist, term used, usually, for offenders. No to those who defraud the tax, place their money in tax havens … He must not like very much, these Ploucs bretons, a geo-cultural idea for Jean-Yves Le Drian, who even sees it as a compliment! Neither the one who with kwassa-kwassa, in Mayotte, fishes little but brings Comorian. Neither the employees of this slaughterhouse of Gad, which, clumsiness of a junior minister, he spoke: this slaughterhouse, there is a majority of women in this society. There are some who are, for many, illiterate (14)

The minister, the candidate, President Macron speaks different languages ​​that say the same thing but to different audiences. Some are on the safe side, there is little to tell them. The measures are sufficient. For the others. He has to convince them. Make them understand that he does not need their opinion. That the experts are at work. Modern. Effective. That they must not be in solidarity with the slackers of those who sow the brothel, of those who refuse reforms, a little music that could be called, Poujadism or populism of centrists.

 

Brexit and citizenship of the European Union

Brexit et citoyenneté de l'Union européenne


In the negotiations between the United Kingdom and the European Union, the status of Union citizens residing in the United Kingdom and that of the British in the 27 States of the Union is an important point, on which notable progress would have taken place.
Of which we do not know, as usual, the content.


On 30 March 2017, the United Kingdom activated Article 50 of the Treaty of Lisbon, the negotiators have two years to complete the Brexit conditions and the future partnership. Elections for the European Parliament will take place in June 2019 and, in France, municipal elections in March 2020.
It is therefore urgent to know in which conditions British citizens may or may not participate


Since 1992, the Treaties (1) stipulate that is « a citizen of the Union any person having the nationality of a Member State … Citizens of the Union … have … the right to vote and eligibility for the elections to the European Parliament and the municipal elections in the Member State where they reside, under the same conditions as nationals of that State … ‘


Will British citizens living in European Union countries be able to vote in these elections as they did in previous European and municipal elections? And nationals of the 27 European Union countries residing in the United Kingdom?


For the European elections in the United Kingdom, things are simple. If it is noted that the United Kingdom does not belong to the Union, there will be no election of deputies for the European Parliament.
Citizens of the 27, residing in the United Kingdom will be able to vote only in their country of origin according to their legislation.
For the British living in a state of the European Union, things are a little different. States will no longer have the obligation to give them the right to vote and stand for election, but nothing prevents them from doing so.


In October 2003, following the dispute between Spain and the United Kingdom over the elections to the European Parliament in Gibraltar in which Commonwealth nationals who are not British nationals took part, the European Commission considered that the UK extended the right to vote to persons residing in Gibraltar within the scope of the discretion conferred on the Member States by Community law … No general principle of Community law provides that, for the elections to the European Parliament, the electorate must be limited to EU citizens (2, 3, 4). It is therefore up to each State to decide unless the new treaty stipulates otherwise. It would be paradoxical, however, for the EU to punish the most European citizens who demonstrate their willingness to integrate with the peoples of Europe.


In France, the Constitutional Council ruled that with regard to the right to vote and ineligibility, it was not necessary to amend the Constitution (5)

(5)

Brexit et citoyenneté de l'Union européenne

The question is more complex regarding municipal elections. The States of the Union are obliged to give the right to vote and to stand for municipal elections to citizens of the Union living in their territory.

 

Citizens of the 27 EU countries that did not have British nationality, residing in the United Kingdom, were able to vote and eventually to be candidates. Conversely, the British were able to vote and stand as candidates at the municipal elections in the 27 countries of the Union when they did not have the nationality. The citizens of the Union, living in France, participate in these elections since the municipal elections of 2001.

 

In 2014, 5954 foreign nationals were candidates in the municipal elections. Only two countries of the Union did not have any candidates during this election: Malta and Estonia … The most numerous candidates were the British, 1525 candidates, then the Belgians, 1186, and the Portuguese, 1045 (6 ). Remarkably, for the municipalities with more than 3,000 inhabitants, 80 non-French European citizens have been candidates on lists of the Rassemblement Bleu Marine, including Bulgarians and Romanians (7).

 

What will happen to the next municipal elections in Europe?

The situation is not the same in all the States of the Union (8).
In some, all foreign residents have the right to vote and stand for municipal elections regardless of their nationality.
The British will therefore retain these rights.

In others, some foreign residents have the right to vote following the signing of reciprocal agreements between the country of residence and the state of which they are nationals. These states may eventually sign agreements with the United Kingdom

 

In countries which, like France, recognize this right only to nationals, the British will be excluded from these elections.
Unless new legislation: reciprocity agreement that would not deprive the British of rights they have exercised in the past or, broader agreement between the United Kingdom and the Union, keeping their rights, for municipal elections, British in the Union and to Union citizens in the United Kingdom.

 

In France, the article of the French Constitution revised on the opportunity of the Maastricht Treaty says: subject to reciprocity and in the manner provided for by the Treaty of the European Union signed on 7 February 1992, the right to vote and to stand for election Municipal elections may be granted only to Union citizens residing in France…
Will the new treaty be considered a consolidation of earlier treaties? Or will it require a new amendment of the Constitution?

The withdrawal of the right to vote and to stand for the British living on the territory would be a decline of representative democracy. It could be interpreted as a gesture of reprisal penalizing British living on the territory as they showed their willingness to integrate into the social and political life of the country.

British Prime Minister Theresa May has just made a declaration of love to some 3 million European citizens living in the United Kingdom (9). It would be inappropriate for Theresa May to oppose the granting of a status which would allow nationals of either of the two parties residing in the territory of the other party to lose their electoral rights.

An European solution could go further.
Taking note that the right to vote of the British in all the States of the Union, and of all the foreigners in many of them, posed no problem and, rather, was a factor of integration, the European Union could take the opportunity to extend the right to vote and eligibility of all foreign residents in municipal elections.
First step towards a European citizenship of residence (10).

 

Brexit et citoyenneté de l'Union européenne

It is not sure that the Heads of State and Government are ready.
In France, in 20 polls, since 1994, La Lettre de la Citoyenneté (11) asked the same question. Since 2006, the respondents have responded favorably (10 surveys) to the extension of the voting rights for municipal and European elections to all residents regardless of their nationality: in the last survey by 56% against 39% (12).

 

Brexit et citoyenneté de l'Union européenne

1 –

1 – Twentieth Article of the consolidated version of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (2012 / C 326/01)

2 – Lettre de La citoyenneté n° 68, mars avril 2004


3 –
EUROPEAN COMMISSION, Communiqué of October 29, 2003.

4 –COURT OF JUSTICE OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES, Judgment of September 12, 2006, Case C145-04, Spain v. United Kingdom.

5 –CONSTITUTIONAL COUNCIL, Decision No. 92-308 of April  6,1992

.6 – Huffingtonpost.fr 05/10/2016

7 – LeFigaro.fr 19/03/14

8 – Thirteen countries do not give voting rights to foreigners: Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Latvia, Malta, Poland, Romania.
Twelve give the right to vote to all foreigners: Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Hungary, Ireland, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden.
Two conditions of reciprocity: Spain, Portugal.
The United Kingdom has given the right to vote and eligibility to all foreigners who are members of a Commonwealth country for all elections.

9 – Libération 20/10/17

10 – Résidents Étrangers, Citoyens ! Plaidoyer pour une citoyenneté européenne de résidence ! Presse pluriel, octobre 2003.

11 – La Lettre de la citoyenneté n°149 septembre-octobre 2017

12 – Survey conducted by telephone from September 7 to 9, 2017 by Harris Interactive’s political opinion department (Jean-Daniel Lévy and Gaspard Lancrey-Javal) for La Lettre de la citoyenneté. Sample of 1,005 people representative of French aged 18 and over. Quota method and adjustment applied to the following variables: sex, age, socio-professional category and region of the interviewee.

To find out more: Le droit de vote des étrangers, une histoire de 40 ans, Bernard Delemotte, La Licorne-L’Harmattan, April 2017